Designer Profile: Jay Britto and David Charette

We had the pleasure of meeting Margaret Charette with design firm Britto Charette in March when she attended the Design Bloggers Conference in Los Angeles, California, and we shared her blog post about the event here. Today we are profiling the founding principals of Miami-based Britto Charette, Jay Britto and David Charette.

Jay Britto, founding principal of Britto Charette, has spent more than a decade creating high-end residential interiors. His knowledge of innovative trends and his unsurpassed contemporary style have earned him an impressive and loyal clientele. Born and raised in Peru, Jay grew up surrounded by rich colors and a vibrant culture that continue to inspire him. His love of all things beautiful translates into everything Jay does.

David Charette, founding principal of Britto Charette and licensed interior designer, has completed compelling design projects around the globe. He earned a BA and MA in architecture from the University of Detroit and he has more than 20 years of experience working with city planners, contractors, regulatory agencies, and architects. David’s impressive portfolio of progressive design initiatives includes luxury residential interiors, corporate campuses, GSA and higher education. His experiences also include urban planning, master planning, zoning, streetscapes and interior design.

SRFD: How did you become interested in design?

David Charette: After numerous trips as a child to the Detroit Institute of Art and after traveling across the United States with my family in the summer, I started to develop a great interest in design. I thought skyscrapers were the coolest things in the world … Still do! Reading late into the night was also very inspiring. My parents would unscrew the fuses in my room so I’d have to put the book down. But the biggest thing was Lego’s! Having a limited amount of them forced me to constantly tear apart one idea to create another.

Jay Britto: My interest in design evolved, really. Music was one of my first passions and essentially opened the door to creativity and the arts for me. At eighteen, when I was struggling with affording college and choosing a major (architecture or interiors), music was always there, pushing me forward. Patterns and rhythms in music just seemed to be echoed in everything around me. That’s when I realized that my calling was actually interiors. I could walk into a space and visualize the textures, colors and patterns that it needed.

SRFD: Tell us about a recent project you really enjoyed.

David Charette: We have been working on a penthouse at the Ritz Carlton. We began working early-on with our client and the architect of record—before construction even began—which made for great communication and saved money for the client. Because it’s on the top floor, we have 15’ ceilings, which are really unprecedented in penthouse design. We were able to take full advantage of the views.

SRFD: A trend you’re over?

A tough question because we never want to offend anyone, but if pressed to answer …

Jay Britto: Mica wall covering.

David Charette: Textured MDF panels.

SRFD: A trend you’re excited about?

Jay Britto: I love the mixing of metals. Designers and clients are no longer conservative about matchy-matchy, all brass or all chrome. It’s a great look.

David Charette: I’m really excited about the advancement of LED light fixtures. They have revolutionized design with their efficiency, color options, dimmer controls and light dispersement. The possibilities are fantastic.

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