Category: Designer Council

The Mark of Monogram At KBIS 2020

The 2020 Kitchen and Bath Industry Show (KBIS) in Las Vegas earlier this year was truly a celebration for Monogram with the launch of two new luxury appliance collections, the Statement Collection and the Minimalist Collection. Inspired by professional culinary spaces highlighting precision-engineered details, the two distinct collections exceed expectations in style and performance.

KBIS attendees enjoyed a first look at the new collections inside the impressive Monogram booth, which featured custom-curated vignettes imagined and brought to life by highly accomplished designer Richard Anuszkiewicz.

Monogram’s KBIS kitchen vignettes were a thought provoking exploration of what a kitchen should or can be. Built around Monogram’s newest Statement and Minimalist collections, each space was meticulously designed to reflect the elegance and craftsmanship that is a signature of Monogram appliances.

Partners featured inside the Monogram Experience at KBIS included:

  • BENTWOOD CABINETRYShowcasing new door styles, Monogram’s brand standards, Pearl and Cerused Walnut, customer cabinetry finishes and designer Richard Anuszkiewicz’s signature Richard Living Red Interiors.
  • SAPIENSTONE COUNTERTOPS Unveiling the new Basalt Black finish in the Butler’s Pantry as well as Monogram’s brand standards, polished Arabescato and Pietra Gray, in a 2” mitered edge detail.
  • GROTHOUSE SOLID WOOD SURFACES A bespoke Parsons table pushing Grothouse lumber capability to new heights. Comprised of hand planed wenge wood with proprietary Durata finish, stainless steel with fully integrated Monogram appliances and inlay accents of Grothouse’s signature Anvil brass real metal finish. A one-of-a-kind piece with unparalleled craftsmanship.
  • KALLISTA PLUMBING The Statement kitchen displays the Bacifiore 30” polished hammered sink with Quincy Collection faucetry in exquisite unlacquered brass.
  • ANN SACKS TILE A statement hood designed by Richard Anuszkiewicz executing the Versailles antique mirror tile in a thought‐provoking manor, Python smoked antique mirror will shine in the Butler’s Pantry and the French bistro with Erose Grey Chevron Mosaic at the hearth oven and fire box.
  • GALLEY SINKS – The Minimalist kitchen displays fine kitchen furniture in the 6’ galley dresser in polished eucalyptus wood with the unmatched function of the galley workstation sink.
  • KRAVET FABRICS The idea of the greatest showman would not be complete without a theater. Kravet high performance velvet drapery wraps the entire Monogram booth to give a warm theater, showman quality and feel.
  • PHILLIP JEFFRIES WALLCOVERING The Minimalist kitchen features the Deco Leaf abstract metal collection specialty metallic silver leaf wallcovering.
  • LUKE LAMP CO. LIGHTING – The ever‐artistic Luke Lamp Co. is back to the Monogram booth again for 2020 with a dual pair of handcrafted brand new Surrey Sconce.
  • TEXTURES WOOD FLOORING – This boutique Nashville Company is bringing real wood floors to the Monogram booth experience with a 7” plank Northern Appalachian Walnut, live sawn in a butternut custom color and a 7” plank Northern Appalachian White Oak flooring in a warm whiskey barrel color.
  • ARTERIORS LIGHTING / ACCESSORIES – Each distinct and special, the Aja Art Light, Anthony Shaded Sconce and Trapeze Sconce are featured in the booth, as well as a beautiful assortment of Arteriors decorative accessories and furnishings.
  • LE CREUSET An assortment of luxury enameled cast iron cookware in White with brass knobs, and new colors Black Metallic and Meringue Ombre.
  • SCALAMANDRE FABRICS – Straight from inspiration on the fashion runways, the Leopardo ivory gold and black completes the Monogram Statement kitchen banquette.

For more information about the Monogram brand and available products, visit monogram.com and follow @monogramappliances on Instagram, Pinterest or YouTube to experience the #MarkofLuxury.

Monogram Takes it to The Next Level at KBIS

In 2019, Monogram made an indelible mark at the Kitchen and Bath Industry Show (KBIS) with a booth exquisitely executed by respected designer Richard Anuszkiewicz. The impeccable space wowed designers, builders, homeowners, architects and everyone in attendance, nabbing the honor of Best Large Booth at the renowned trade show.

“This year, we wanted to take it to the next level,” says Richard, who is once again leading the design of Monogram’s booth at KBIS, which takes place in Las Vegas from Jan. 21-23.

“In every which way we tried to heighten the space. It’s a true showpiece,” adds Richard, who describes the Monogram designs as “future-minded, but with a nod to the past that honors the heritage of craftsmanship.”

The stunning KBIS booth has a theater-like quality, with plush velvet curtains serving as a backdrop to the stars of the show: two separate kitchens featuring Monogram’s new Statement Collection and Minimalist Collection, which were launched in early 2020. Both designs exude thought-provoking concepts, meticulously selected materials and attention to detail.

The Statement Kitchen is a contemporary take on French gourmet influence. It showcases a library wall book case with integrated floating wall ovens and a classic French hearth custom hood above Monogram’s never-before-seen 48-inch professional range and bespoke gold hearth oven. An exotic eucalyptus refrigeration armoire in a starburst tailored grain pattern with leather stitched appliance handles is a show‐stopper.

The Minimalist Kitchen takes inspiration from a dining room setting. The centerpiece of this modern room is a fresh take on a Parson’s table, with both gas and induction cooking elements suspended like pieces of art. The table is comprised of hand‐planed wood, stainless steel counters with brass-inlay detailing. Bringing further dimension to an often‐austere palette, the Minimalist kitchen has two signature brass refrigeration panels by Richard Anuszkiewicz.

“We wanted to bring our booth to life in a multifaceted way by incorporating an interactive ‘show within a show” to enhance and engage each of the audience’s five senses, to stand out from the crowd, and to be ‘The Greatest Showman,’” says Christina Reed, Monogram’s Senior Manager of Custom Display Design. “From enhanced cooking technology to meticulously curated materials, the attendees will be taken on the Monogram brand story and find an appreciation for the finer details used within our products.”

The design team focused on showcasing forward-thinking design — from exotic woods to fine-quality metals — and state-of-the-art products that highlight the mark of luxury you can see and feel.

“2020 is the year of Monogram,” Christina says, “and we are setting a new tone while also elevating to the next standard of luxury unprecedented in this industry.”

Follow along on social media with the hashtag #markofmonogram

Meet the Council: Lori Gilder

California designer uses Monogram to highlight soul, spirit and style

Lori Gilder considers herself one of the “lucky ones” because, at an early age, she already knew what her life’s work would be.

Fascinated by architecture, interiors and puzzles as a child, she knew she wanted to explore how those elements collided to create unique living environments.

Now running her own design firm, Lori says her approach to design is to, “…create chic and classically modern interiors that are elegant and tranquil – by blending organic and natural materials – that integrate seamlessly with the surrounding architecture and landscape.” Monogram helps Lori achieve those goals in the kitchen with clean lines and minimalist design.

Being a part of the inaugural Monogram Designer Council and having a voice within the product development space is very exciting to Lori. “I’ve been most interested in the launch of the Minimalist Collection, as this design aesthetic speaks directly to our client base,” says Lori. As a luxury interior designer, her clients rely on the knowledge and expertise in all aspects of sourcing and product specifications. Lori believes in Monogram’s quality of craftsmanship, state-of-the-art technology and product aesthetic.

Photography by Karyn Millet

Her design firm collaborated with Monogram on a recent project. “We gutted and renovated a 1958 mid-century home in Beverly Hills,” says Lori. They removed a fabulous, 60-year-old, original, pink, metal General Electric kitchen – that was still working – and reimagined it with more organic aesthetic and natural materials. “Partnering with Monogram, and integrating updated GE brand appliances into this modern project, proved to be a huge success for us and for our client.” Lori expects the appliances to last for years to come, just as the pink predecessors.

Photography by Karyn Millet

Now more than ever, Lori is convinced it’s time to rethink how kitchens are designed. “The function of the kitchen is evolving into the ultimate living space,” says Lori. It takes on several roles throughout the course of a day. It’s where meals are prepared and served, where families lounge, where business deals are made and where parties gather. The kitchen really is the heartbeat of a home.

Pattern Addict and Designer Drew McGukin

Written by Kim Mays, content strategist for Monogram

A part-time college gig selling real estate in Atlanta brought Drew McGukin into the world of home ownership. “I fell in love with the whole process—begged my broker to hire me as her assistant. 10 years later, I had built a huge business selling 70+ homes a year,” said McGukin. That’s how he realized he had a keen eye for space. In 2008, he took a break from real estate to follow his new passion as he enrolled in The New York School of Interior Design. Now, he’s the lead designer in his own firm, which he started in New York in October 2010. McGukin also recently joined the Monogram Designer Council, where he shares ideas and suggestions with the Monogram team and other designers on the council.

As a self-proclaimed “pattern addict,” McGukin is known for his bold choices in home design. As for kitchens, he feels that bold choices should be expressed through use of unique materials. “I recently wallpapered walls, cabinetry, and my refrigerator in a chic Surfaces by David Bonk vinyl. It’s easy to clean and adds a nice layer,” he said. The island in this kitchen was designed out of copper so the natural patina will change over time, adding further depth and color to the kitchen.

“I also love thoughtful decoration in kitchens,” said McGukin, “people often forget to add artwork, mix in beautiful shapes, and accessories.” After installing a small art piece as cabinet hardware on a cabinet over his refrigerator, McGukin says “Who says we have to use a basic cabinet pull?”

If the kitchen is the “soul” of the home, designers need to capture the soul of the client and build a design around that in much the same way McGukin has done with his kitchen. He recommends a two-fold approach:

  1. Make strong decisions and thoughtfully design an envelope around timelessness and function.
  2. Allow your inner decorator to enjoy some freedom in the layers, color, texture, and overall mood of the space.

One big mistake people make in kitchen design according to McGukin is “trying to tick all the boxes.” Instead of trying to include every cool bell and whistle you like from other major kitchens, step back and try to make a list of what is absolutely important. Sometimes you have to let go of something you want to fit in something you really need—like nixing a second wall oven to fit in that Monogram Advantium oven.

McGukin loves how Monogram delivers products with a modern aesthetic that are also reliable and amazingly functional. “It’s inspiring to see how beautifully Monogram is integrating design and a designer’s vision into the basic tenants of their products,” says McGukin. He also feels that his clients enjoy Monogram’s breadth of options and deliver greater value than other luxury brands.

As for his time on the Designer Council, McGukin loves all the people and the team from Monogram. He also has a solid plan for his tenure: “I hope to be a strong voice for actual, true, good-old-fashioned interior design on the Monogram Designer Council.” We’re happy to have you aboard and thoroughly enjoy hearing your ideas, Drew.

A Modernist at Heart

Written by Kim Mays, content strategist for Monogram

A modernist at heart, Nicholas Moriarty found a way to satisfy his intellectual and creative sides: interior design. As a child, he “spent countless hours watching This Old House,” which delved into the ways an older space could be renovated to become something more modern and spectacular. It prepared him for his ultimate career path, where he shines among his peers.

Bucktown living room designed by Nicolas Moriarty

“I’m a modernist at heart,” Moriarty said. His favorite design periods are Bauhaus and Art Deco, which were both very forward-thinking at the time of their popularity, and aspects of both are very relevant today. “The design principles of these eras never really faded away—they just adapted,” said Moriarty.

In that vein of thought, Moriarty feels that the new Monogram Minimalist Collection speaks to his design aesthetic and epitomizes the modernist principles. The elimination of handles and knobs wherever possible harkens to the Modernist principle where removal of ornamentation and excessive decoration was important to the style. Modernism also brought forth the ideal that craftsmanship was of utmost importance, which Monogram also takes very seriously. Each appliance is meticulously engineered to function as fabulously as it looks. And to Moriarty, they’re worth every penny: “The amazing cost to quality ratio [for Monogram appliances] is second to none in the industry.”

Monogram Minimalist Collection single wall oven launching in 2020

When designing modern, upscale kitchens, Moriarty feels that balancing functionality with aesthetic can be quite challenging. “As a home cook, I inherently know the ins and outs of a properly functioning kitchen’ sometimes minimal design is at odds with this,” he said. To ensure the cooking space functions as well as it looks, his team spends a great deal of time guiding their clients through the entire design process so they can provide a kitchen that looks sleek, but still provides the right tools and space for culinary creativity.

Moriarty hopes that as a designer, he can engage with brands like Monogram to pass on his insights. “I want to help push the industry forward in any way I can.” Being on the Monogram Designer Council is one way he is sharing his ideas and gathering input from other designers. Moriarty loves “the comradery that exists between all of the designers,” and said “I truly appreciate how receptive Monogram is as a company to constructive criticism. They want to make the industry better with us, which I think speaks volumes about who they are as a brand.”

We agree, Nicholas. And we look forward to learning more about what our designers want and need through their investment in the Designer Council.

Monogram Designer Council

The Monogram Designer Council was created to serve as the consultative voice for our brand decisions and showcase Monogram’s commitment to the design community. Comprised of 18 designers from over 10 cities, we brought the Monogram Designer Council together to cultivate a vision on everything from the design of our products to the experience of ownership. Each designer’s expertise will help Monogram realize timeless design trends and available opportunities.

 

 

Sleek, Modern Florida Kitchen Seamlessly Integrates with Monogram Appliances

In Boca Raton, Florida, designer Caroline Torchin creates modern, luxury spaces for her clients, which include both vacation homes and permanent residences. Torchin believes “the kitchen is the heart of the home,” and for good reason—it tends to be the place where meals are shared, entertaining happens, and family congregates. She also is a big fan of Monogram appliances and recently was named a member of our Monogram Designer Council, where she and more than a dozen other designers from around the country will meet and help influence upcoming Monogram designs and features.

Torchin recommends Monogram appliances to many of her clients because she sees how it ties her goals together. “My main goal is to give function as well as aesthetics, and I think Monogram nails it,” Torchin said. “I think the efficiency, the speed, the technology, is on point.”

 

Her latest kitchen design featured Monogram appliances for a condominium client who enjoys cooking, and who sought a modern, timeless design for their kitchen. Though her designs tend to lean toward rustic chic, she loves how this kitchen features a bit more glam and shine. The cabinet finish is in dual tones of acrylic gloss white and gloss oak. The wood grain brings warmth to the kitchen along with the Pompeii quartz countertops in White Macaubas, which feature veins of a natural, warm gray.

The seamless countertops were quite a challenge to install in this 7th floor condominium. The elevator was only 8-feet tall, and the long countertop was 11-feet in length. After the client specifically requested keeping the countertop seamless, the only option was to hire a crane company to hoist the 11’x4’ quartz countertop up to the client’s balcony on a rather windy day. Thankfully, the installation went off without a hitch and the kitchen looks just as sleek as the countertops.

 

The walls were painted using Benjamin Moore Decorators White, and the flooring features 24” x 48” porcelain tiles, which hold up well to traffic. Each piece of the design flows seamlessly into the next, which is exactly what Torchin loves about the space. “The flush installation of the appliances complements the sleekness of my design,” Torchin said. The highlight of this is the Monogram integrated panel refrigerator clad in matching gloss oak to blend with the cabinetry. It’s unobtrusive and elevates the design to a whole new level.

We are thrilled with the look of this modern kitchen and are excited to be a big influence on Caroline Torchin’s designs. We look forward to working with Caroline and the others on the Monogram Designer Council this year.

 

Modernism Week Condo Kitchen

When interior designer Staci Munic bought her condo in the historic William Cody Tennis Club Homes, she learned the community would be added to the Modernism Week home tours—if she could get her home remodeled in time. Challenge accepted.

The home was built in 1966 by influential desert modern architect William Francis Cody. It had been through a remodel in the 1980s, so Munic wanted to bring it up to date while paying homage to its modernism roots. After many challenges, including putting in a large steel I beam so she could enlarge her kitchen without the ceiling crashing down, her space was on the tour and ready for guests to “ooh and ahh” over her smart, modern take on mid-century design for 2019.

The former galley kitchen is now a bright (thanks to a generous skylight), open space, ready for the former-chef-turned-designer to entertain her friends and family. “I need to breathe in my kitchen, and I need to be able to interact with my family and friends while I am preparing meals and cocktails,” said Munic of her new space. “When it’s just me at home, it makes me so happy to be able to view and take in my entire living space from behind my kitchen counter,” she added. Indeed, the kitchen design flows well into the living room—the entire condo is painted in Edward Dunn Whisper and the flooring throughout is 33” square porcelain tile that looks remarkably like terrazzo, which brings a consistency and seamlessness to the whole space.

Munic’s relaxed, casual chic style can be felt through all of her designs, including her own. She feels that great lighting is a key element to each of her designs, and she takes pride in her ability to provide a well-lit, extremely useable space. The large skylight in the center of her kitchen brings in the cheery Palm Springs sun and extends the warmth of her wood cabinetry, which includes her custom panel refrigerator. On top of her cabinets, Munic used Silestone White Zeus Extreme for durability and brightness. Her backsplash features tiles in a warm gray.

With her culinary school background, Munic loves to cook, so her full Monogram kitchen brings function along with its aesthetics. “I am infatuated with my induction cooktop and my Advantium oven,” said Munic. “I’m not sure which one I love more, but they are jealous of each other, for sure. And don’t get me started on my dishwasher,” she added. Munic also loves the smart kitchen technology provided by the WiFi connected appliances. “What I think I love most about my Monogram appliances is that they are all made in America… by people who generally care about making people’s lives better through engineering high quality, performance appliances,” she said.

Staci Munic’s 2019 nod to mid-century modern design shows that you can keep the feel of the 1960s while bringing your kitchen into the 21st century. Monogram is proud to be a part of her home and excited to work with Munic and other designers on the 2019 Monogram Designer Council.